FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Do I need a referral from my GP?

What does an Osteopathic treatment involve?

How long does an Osteopathic treatment take?

Is it safe to receive treatment if I am pregnant?

Do you treat children and teenagers?

Am I able to claim for Osteopathic treatment?

How does Osteopathy differ from Physiotherapy and Chiropractic?


Do I need a referral from my GP?
While patients are often referred to us by their GP, personal trainer or other health practitioner, you do not actually require a referral to see us. The only exception is if you are a DVA patient, in which case you will need your GP to fill in the appropriate form made out to the osteopath you are going to see.


What does an Osteopathic treatment involve?
Your osteopath will take a comprehensive medical history and conduct a thorough clinical examination, including any relevant orthopaedic tests.  As your osteopath needs to assess how well different parts of your body move, you may be asked to remove outer layers of clothing. Gowns and towels are always available. Once they have reached a diagnosis for your pain or problem, osteopathic treatment can involve gentle joint mobilisation, high velocity/low amplitude thrust, muscle energy, soft tissue massage and indirect ligamentous balancing or craniosacral techniques. Your osteopath will advise you as to appropriate exercises and/or ergonomic recommendations to aid your recovery and may also recommend posture or lifestyle changes.
Please bring with you any X-rays, CT scans, MRIs or other test results that may be relevant.


How long does an Osteopathic treatment take?
The initial consultation takes between 45 minutes and one hour. Return consultations take about 30 minutes.


Is it safe to receive treatment if I am pregnant?
Yes. Osteopathy can be beneficial to mother and baby by helping the body adjust to the changes required for a comfortable pregnancy. We will tailor our treatments to minimise any undue strain on the body.  We even have a special pregnancy pillow with a cut-out hole that makes it possible to safely lie on your tummy.
Pregnancy is a time when the body has to make many changes to accommodate the growing baby. This can result in problems such as low back pain, sciatica, shoulder pain, pelvic pain, and heartburn or indigestion. Osteopathic treatment can help your body prepare for the demands of labour and also aid in recovery following the birth.


Do you treat children and teenagers?
Yes. Just like adults, children and teenagers can suffer from accidents or illnesses, sporting injuries and postural problems especially with the growing use of ipads and computers.  In addition, growing pains are not uncommon in children.  It is important to address these issues early so as to prevent ongoing issues as they get older and also to pick up on any conditions that may require referral.    


Am I able to claim for Osteopathic treatment?
All treatments must be paid for on the day of consultation.  If you have private health insurance, you will be able to claim the benefit directly from your health fund via our HICAPs terminal at the time of consultation. If you have been referred by your GP as part of the Chronic Pain Management/Enhanced Primary Care Program, you will need to pay for your treatment at the time of consultation but we can organise for the Medicare refund to be directly deposited into your account. Workcover and TAC patients will need to send their receipt in to the appropriate organisation to be reimbursed.


How does Osteopathy differ from Physiotherapy and Chiropractic?
As we are trained in the practice of Osteopathy it is difficult for us to comment on how physiotherapists and chiropractors work. We feel that our principles make us unique in the way that we approach and treat a problem. The four key principles are as follows:

  • The body is a unit – all the body systems work together as a whole.
  • Structure and function are interrelated – if a body part is injured or impaired in some way it will affect how it works, and if a body part has not been functioning properly it will affect its structure.
  • The body is capable of self-regulation and self-healing – these capabilities can be maximised by ensuring all body parts have optimum blood flow, lymphatic drainage and neural supply.
  • Osteopathic treatment is based on application of the first three principles.

Each osteopath may practise slightly differently, using different techniques, however the principles guiding the treatment are the same.